How does the author introduce the lottery and how does it contribute to the development of the plot?

How does the author develop the theme in The Lottery?

In “The Lottery,” Shirley Jackson uses imagery and symbolism to develop theme. … One of the themes of the story is questioning the blind following of traditions, and Jackson wants the reader to understand that traditions are part of all cultures in all places, thus depicting the village as an “ordinary” place.

How does the setting of The Lottery contribute to the story?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

What is the author trying to teach us in The Lottery?

The moral lessons of “The Lottery,” therefore, are that evil comes of conformity, and that the worst things we do are often things so familiar to us that we do not even trouble to think of them in moral terms or question their value.

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What is the author Shirley Jackson’s main purpose in writing the short story The Lottery?

Shirley Jackson’s purpose in writing “The Lottery” was to show ordinary people in small-town America committing an evil act without any malevolent motive, or even any motive at all.

What is the moral lesson of the story The Lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition. In the story, Tessie Hutchinson doesn’t speak out against the lottery or try to change the status quo until she herself is affected.

Which statement is a theme of The Lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

What is the significance of choosing a small town as the setting for The Lottery?

Through the use of setting in “The Lottery,” Jackson argues that blindly following tradition can make even the most innocent seeming of small towns seem monstrous. The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are.

What is the plot of The Lottery?

The plot of “The Lottery” involves the selection of a lottery “winner” out of the residents of a small fictitious town. The “winner” will be sacrificed to ensure that the year’s crops are good.

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Why was Tessie Hutchinson singled out as the winner?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death. 4.

How does The Lottery relate to real life?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

What is Shirley Jackson trying to tell us about ourselves?

She is trying to tell us that we should be guided by our moral compass, not merely by the expectations of society. If something is unjust or wrong, we should stand up against it.

What is the deeper meaning of The Lottery?

The lottery itself is clearly symbolic and, at its most basic, that symbol is of the unquestioned rituals and traditions which drive our society. The author considers those things which make no inherent sense, yet are done because that is how they have always been done.