Question: What does the Lottery by Shirley Jackson say about society?

What is Shirley Jackson trying to say about society in The Lottery?

Jackson’s “The Lottery” is very much a scapegoat story. … Jackson is suggesting that given the right circumstances, even “normal” human beings are capable of atrocities, but again, that scapegoating is also an everyday occurence, though on a less tragic level.

How does The Lottery relate to today’s society?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

What is the point that the story The Lottery is making about society?

The author of the book “The Lottery” wrote the story “showing meaningless violence and universal inhumane behavior in my life” to shock the reader of the story (Jackson 211). This story reflects human behavior in society to show how rules, laws or traditions are pointless but people follow them.

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What does The Lottery say about community?

In “The Lottery”, Shirley Jackson shows the theme of the violence within a small village through symbolism to show that even the most ordinary people can commit violence, which can eventually lead to killing innocent individuals.

What does the black box symbolize in the lottery?

The Black Box

The shabby black box represents both the tradition of the lottery and the illogic of the villagers’ loyalty to it. The black box is nearly falling apart, hardly even black anymore after years of use and storage, but the villagers are unwilling to replace it.

What is the main conflict between a character and society in the lottery?

Expert Answers

The main conflict of this short story is character versus society because it is society that insists upon the continuation of the lottery as a tradition, and it is this tradition—upheld by society—which is responsible for the brutal end of Tessie Hutchinson ‘s life. We can see how attached this…

What is the message of The Lottery?

The primary message of Shirley Jackson’s celebrated short story “The Lottery” concerns the dangers of blindly following traditions. In the story, the entire community gathers in the town square to participate in the annual lottery.

What social issues are represented in The Lottery?

Jackson’s work examines the issues such as human cruelty, social sanctioning of violence, as well as marginalization leading to victimization. These themes encompass specific traditions, practices, and laws that lie at the heart of the work’s meaning.

What is the moral lesson of the story the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition. In the story, Tessie Hutchinson doesn’t speak out against the lottery or try to change the status quo until she herself is affected.

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What was the main purpose of the lottery?

An author’s purpose in writing a story is generally expressed in the theme. In this case, Shirley Jackson wrote “The Lottery” in order to express the theme of mindless adherence to tradition.

What is the author’s purpose in the lottery?

Shirley Jackson’s purpose in writing “The Lottery” was to show ordinary people in small-town America committing an evil act without any malevolent motive, or even any motive at all.